Posts tagged “emerging professional

What makes you different?

pink cubicle

When everyone in your company is striving to achieve the same objective, how do you standout amongst your colleagues? What makes you different from Bobby and Suzy if everyone is trying to seek the approval of the same executive management and out perform each other? No really.. I’m asking you because I have no idea.

There are times in your career when you push yourself out of the ordinary to go above and beyond your expectations with the hope that your efforts will pay off in some form of reward. Sometimes the reward is paid in monetary value other times it is just the simple acknowledgement of your company. Whatever your incentive may have been or is, there is no guarantee that the time you invest and the effort you have made will play out in your favor. So what can you do to increase your chances of being recognized for your high performance?

(1.) Be genuine. Don’t expect to be rewarded for efforts that only benefit yourself. Your talents are worth more than that. When you begin working on a project, think of ways that your efforts will result in mutual benefit for your entire company and your professional development. Think as big as what you can do to contribute to your company’s financial bottom line or as small as sharing your previous experiences with your teammates to ensure their success.  Simple and small but extremely genuine.

(2.) Trust your instincts. When you’ve set a foundation of pure intentions, don’t second guess yourself. Trust your instincts on what you feel is right. At the end of the project, if your name is on the dotted line, make sure that whatever decisions you have made are your decisions. Listen to the voice inside your head and don’t doubt yourself because you were assigned to the project for a reason.

(3.) Know your shortcomings. Even super heroes knew their weaknesses and it never stopped them from achieving their goals. Even if you aren’t good at one thing, you are great at many other things, so leverage those strengths to obtain your objectives. Knowing your shortcomings doesn’t mean you dwell on them, it simply means you know what your limitations are and you master them through compensating them with your strengths.

(4.) Be a team player. Teamwork makes the dream work. If you are the most senior on the project, your team relies on your experience and leadership but your team also has the ability to contribute a new and fresh perspective, so allow the opportunity come to life. Conversely, if you are an emerging professional, don’t be timid to think out loud and share your ideas. Your team will appreciate your energy and enthusiasm.

(5.) And, above all – be confident. Don’t be afraid of a learning opportunity. The lack of confidence usually stems from fear — the fear of mistakes, rejection, falling short of expectations, and judgement. But the truth is – the outcome is bound to happen, so let it happen confidently. No matter what happens at the end of the day, one thing is for sure – you’ll learn from it. So, sit up in the conference room and speak up at your meetings – you are who you are and you should be proud of it.

If you’ve been true to yourself and put all your cards out on the table but there’s still no traction in your professional career then it leads us to a totally different topic – do you fit into your company’s culture? Have you outgrown your position and exceeded your talent offerings and is it time to move on to allow other people’s talents to shine through? Maybe its time for you to leave your legacy and continue on your journey….

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What are you thinking?

silence

Are you comfortable in silence? Or better yet, are you confident in silence? Whether you are in the car with your boss or on a first date, it is inevitable that there will be a moment of silence that you begin letting your mind wonder to places that asks random questions or generates thoughts that usually turn into words that break the silence.

Your thoughts are powerful. What you think can change so many components of your life – your mood, your attitude, the direction of your career, a relationship, or even a conversation between two people.

Think hard – when was the last time this happened to you? Who was it with and what were the words that broke the silence? It changed the direction of the conversation, did it not?

So, why is it that we watch what we say more than what we think? Shouldn’t it be the other way around since your thoughts lead to the words that come out of your mouth? When you begin to think negative thoughts about your career, don’t your words usually turn conversations into job opportunities? Or, when you begin thinking about the person you can’t live without, aren’t the words usually associated with “love” and “marriage”? The examples are endless, but the focus remains the same. Your thoughts are powerful enough to dictate the conversations that you have with the people around you. Be careful what you begin your day thinking… even if you it doesn’t bother you, it may affect the people around you. Start thinking in a positive way and the words will follow…

I tried to explain why I appreciated the moments of silence between two people last week but I failed to put my thoughts into words – until now.  This is why I appreciate silent moments.  I’m a controlling opportunist, and silent moments are opportunities for me to control my thoughts. Even if I can’t change every aspect of my life or the people around me, I can at least change my thoughts that change my words that might even change the outcome of my life. It’s a simple task that requires a lot of discipline and determination. To constantly think in a positive way is almost impossible, but people do it. It’s evident through the friendly and uplifting moments that you share with friends and family. Now, if only you can change that kind of behavior into habit. I’ve started it in the New Year and I’ll continue to practice it until I perfect it. I apologize in advance for negative words and multi-directional conversations that seem to not have a purpose. As you can see, I’m new to the idea of censoring my thoughts. My only hope is that this concept of “thought censorship” will not only infect the people closest to me, but also affect everyone that I come into contact with – starting with the reader of this entry – you.